Mario DeAngelis Sets The World On Fire!

A Utah filmmaker with a full plate and eager for more to add onto it, maintains the rare mindset of not wanting to attempt something at all if he knows it won’t be done right.

Mario DeAngelis is no stranger to Utah’s film scene. As the founder of the Salty Horror International Film Festival he has worked closely with filmmakers and writers alike and has since lent a hand to numerous films, productions, and festivals. As someone who prefers to keep himself busy, DeAngelis oftentimes finds himself with a schedule full of various movie and writing commitments. When he’s not assisting in Utah’s own Filmquest, producing new work, or lending a hand to local upcoming projects, he somehow manages to find time to write his own pieces, pieces he hopes to get developed into feature films sometime in the future.
For someone who seemingly fell into his career, Mario has taken the industry by the reins and doesn’t appear to be letting go anytime soon. While horror is a genre he loves and can fully appreciate, he doesn’t stray from other styles, an evident trait upon seeing his recent work on films such as “Shoelaces for Christmas”, a local holiday film released last winter. His work speaks for itself and with a portfolio thicker than most in the industry and a career spanning over 15 years, DeAngelis has made connections that are constantly leading him to new projects. He may be asked to help film one day, produce something completely different the next, and then come in and help out during a festival the day after that. His workload is seemingly never ending, yet DeAngelis’ demeanor is relaxed and confident when speaking of his long line of work and commitments. Anyone in his place could be overwhelmed or find themselves stretched too thin, but he somehow seems to be eager to take on more.
For someone with so much under their belt DeAngelis remains anything but the arrogant and cocky film buff most would assume him to be. He’s knowledgeable in the industry and what it takes to succeed, his attitude potentially bordering the line of selfless in his willingness to advise those just coming into film. Patience and persistence are qualities he not only highly recommends to newcomers but also seems to exemplify. While he can confirm that his line of work is a full time job and not for the faint of heart, DeAngelis definitely makes it look easy.

Interview

Scorpius: How did you get into movies?
Mario: It wasn’t the Steven Spielberg “making movies at 8 years old” type of story. But I was making terrible films in college. Honestly I just sort of fell into it. After years of day jobs the universe was telling me that working in an office isn’t where I should be.

Scorpius: How is it to work alone and be your own boss?
Mario: Every day is work. It’s been 15+ years now, and I realize that dates me, but a long time of networking and building these connections. I work with a lot of people I’ve known for years. It’s very unpredictable work. Most people can’t handle it simply because they simply need more stability

Scorpius: Your past work includes a Salty Horror International Film Festival is that right?
Mario: Yes, I worked on Salty Horror International Film Festival. It was great and it eventually came to an end and now here I am (laughs) that’s a whole story.

Scorpius: You seem to work in horror a lot, any reason that genre in particular calls to you?
Mario: Horror is fun. It’s hard, but it’s fun. It’s all a complete fantasy. But I dabble in different genres all the time, I do enjoy horror though

S: Any horror movies or filmmakers that you draw inspiration from?
M: I’m a huge fan of John Carpenter, Hitchcock, any of those. I’m an avid believer in “less is more.” There’s a place for the body horror and the Saw type films, but I love the more subtle, psychological works,“The Birds,” “Halloween,” “Tales from the Crypt.”

S: You’ve worked in film for over two decades, with time have you noticed a huge change in the industry?
M: Everything gets rebooted or remade and they’re all happening much quicker now than they were before. Some are necessary, but most aren’t in my opinion. Recently you had a reboot of Halloween and a remake of It, both were amazing. But then they did a reboot of Leprechaun and no one cared

S: If you could try your hand at rebooting or remaking a piece, what would you attempt?
M: If I could, I’d take a stab at John Carpenter’s “Escape from New York” and try to capture his tone. But I wouldn’t want to do a reboot and screw it up. I’d rather not do anything than do it wrong”

S: Where are you trying to head in your career, where do you see yourself going?
M: I’m trying to keep going with features. At the moment I’m entrenched in the entire Utah film industry. I like to keep myself busy so I work on all types of projects. Last year I helped on a Christmas movie “Shoelaces for Christmas” and this year I helped on “Green Flake.”

S: So between all the films your working on and lending your hand to Filmquest and other festivals it doesn’t seem like you’d have much time
M: If festivals is just something that fills the gaps in between movies for me than that’s great. As long as the festivals don’t become a distraction, feature films are the goal.

S: Anything currently in the works?
M: I have several horror anthology movie ideas. Most ideas I get I think are the universe telling me to get off my butt and make something.

S: Any advice for people going into this industry?
M: Anyone who thinks they want to work in film needs to know not to give up. You can’t stop, and that goes for everything. Failure takes over when you stop or give up. That goes for the film industry as well as the top physicists.

A Utah filmmaker with a full plate and eager for more to add onto it, who maintains the rare mindset of not wanting to attempt something at all if he knows it won’t be done right.

Mario DeAngelis is no stranger to Utah’s film scene. As the founder of the Salty Horror International Film Festival he has worked closely with filmmakers and writers alike and has since lent a hand to numerous films, productions, and festivals. As someone who prefers to keep himself busy, DeAngelis oftentimes finds himself with a schedule full of various movie and writing commitments. When he’s not assisting in Utah’s own Filmquest, producing new work, or lending a hand to local upcoming projects, he somehow manages to find time to write his own pieces, pieces he hopes to get developed into feature films sometime in the future.
For someone who seemingly fell into his career, Mario has taken the industry by the reins and doesn’t appear to be letting go anytime soon. While horror is a genre he loves and can fully appreciate, he doesn’t stray from other styles, an evident trait upon seeing his recent work on films such as “Shoelaces for Christmas”, a local holiday film released last winter. His work speaks for itself and with a portfolio thicker than most in the industry and a career spanning over 15 years, DeAngelis has made connections that are constantly leading him to new projects. He may be asked to help film one day, produce something completely different the next, and then come in and help out during a festival the day after that. His workload is seemingly never ending, yet DeAngelis’ demeanor is relaxed and confident when speaking of his long line of work and commitments. Anyone in his place could be overwhelmed or find themselves stretched too thin, but he somehow seems to be eager to take on more.
For someone with so much under their belt DeAngelis remains anything but the arrogant and cocky film buff most would assume him to be. He’s knowledgeable in the industry and what it takes to succeed, his attitude potentially bordering the line of selfless in his willingness to advise those just coming into film. Patience and persistence are qualities he not only highly recommends to newcomers but also seems to exemplify. While he can confirm that his line of work is a full time job and not for the faint of heart, DeAngelis definitely makes it look easy.

Interview

Scorpius: How did you get into movies?
Mario: It wasn’t the Steven Spielberg “making movies at 8 years old” type of story. But I was making terrible films in college. Honestly I just sort of fell into it. After years of day jobs the universe was telling me that working in an office isn’t where I should be.

Scorpius: How is it to work alone and be your own boss?
Mario: Every day is work. It’s been 15+ years now, and I realize that dates me, but a long time of networking and building these connections. I work with a lot of people I’ve known for years. It’s very unpredictable work. Most people can’t handle it simply because they simply need more stability

Scorpius: Your past work includes a Salty Horror International Film Festival is that right?
Mario: Yes, I worked on Salty Horror International Film Festival. It was great and it eventually came to an end and now here I am (laughs) that’s a whole story.

Scorpius: You seem to work in horror a lot, any reason that genre in particular calls to you?
Mario: Horror is fun. It’s hard, but it’s fun. It’s all a complete fantasy. But I dabble in different genres all the time, I do enjoy horror though

S: Any horror movies or filmmakers that you draw inspiration from?
M: I’m a huge fan of John Carpenter, Hitchcock, any of those. I’m an avid believer in “less is more.” There’s a place for the body horror and the Saw type films, but I love the more subtle, psychological works,“The Birds,” “Halloween,” “Tales from the Crypt.”

S: You’ve worked in film for over two decades, with time have you noticed a huge change in the industry?
M: Everything gets rebooted or remade and they’re all happening much quicker now than they were before. Some are necessary, but most aren’t in my opinion. Recently you had a reboot of Halloween and a remake of It, both were amazing. But then they did a reboot of Leprechaun and no one cared

S: If you could try your hand at rebooting or remaking a piece, what would you attempt?
M: If I could, I’d take a stab at John Carpenter’s “Escape from New York” and try to capture his tone. But I wouldn’t want to do a reboot and screw it up. I’d rather not do anything than do it wrong”

S: Where are you trying to head in your career, where do you see yourself going?
M: I’m trying to keep going with features. At the moment I’m entrenched in the entire Utah film industry. I like to keep myself busy so I work on all types of projects. Last year I helped on a Christmas movie “Shoelaces for Christmas” and this year I helped on “Green Flake.”

S: So between all the films your working on and lending your hand to Filmquest and other festivals it doesn’t seem like you’d have much time
M: If festivals is just something that fills the gaps in between movies for me than that’s great. As long as the festivals don’t become a distraction, feature films are the goal.

S: Anything currently in the works?
M: I have several horror anthology movie ideas. Most ideas I get I think are the universe telling me to get off my butt and make something.

S: Any advice for people going into this industry?
M: Anyone who thinks they want to work in film needs to know not to give up. You can’t stop, and that goes for everything. Failure takes over when you stop or give up. That goes for the film industry as well as the top physicists.

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